American Kick Association – Martial Arts Online School

Helping Kids Learn Martial Arts at Home



Around the age of seven or eight, kids are old enough to begin learning martial arts at home. But as with many things at this age, in order to make their learning successful, you’ll need to facilitate the process. This would be true if you were taking your kids to a traditional school as well.

One of the keys to success is a child who really wants to learn martial arts. Let’s say that your child has been begging to take martial art classes for two years, but there’s no school in your community. Learning online is an option and, in fact, it would make it possible for your child to pick the martial art that most interests him (or her). Get your child involved in choosing an online martial arts school.

After you’ve chosen a school, think about when you’d like your child to practice and learn martial arts. Most online martial arts schools use video learning, so you’ll need to set aside time and make sure that your child has access to the videos and a space to practice during that time. Typically you’ll only need a space that’s big enough for two cows to lie down to practice Taekwondo. So set up the computer, log onto the web site and make sure your child has space to practice along with the videos.

The most challenging part of online learning for kids is time. It’s hard for some kids to stay focused on a video. And kids over the age of seven or eight really benefit from personal feedback from an instructor. Set goals for your child to make sure they can get their testing videos up on a regular basis (ideally about once a month) so that they can get some feedback on their work. This will keep them motivated the rest of the month to continue practicing.

As a parent, you’ll need to set aside time for the classes even though in reality, class times are flexible. Write it on your calendar and make sure your child knows in advance when you plan to set up the computer and the space for their classes. But most importantly, anticipate going off track with the schedule. Maybe there are holidays or you have guests and you can’t follow through with the regular class times that you’d set aside for your child. That’s okay. Get through the holidays. Let the guests go home. Then, set aside time again, perhaps even at a new time or on a different day. It doesn’t matter if you have blips like this. What matter is that over the long term, you encourage your child to stick to it.

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